Asbestos Signs

Asbestos was banned in the UK in 1999, but the material is still present in buildings that were completed prior to 2000. While intact asbestos doesn't pose an immediate health risk, disturbing it by drilling, breaking or dropping the sheets will release asbestos dust and create an immediate threat to people working in the area. This makes refurbishment and renovation work potentially dangerous for your employees. By using an asbestos warning sign, alongside proper employee training, you can help to reduce the chances of asbestos dust being released, and ensure that proper procedure is followed if damage does occur. Read more about the importance of asbestos signs and how to use them.

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What are asbestos signs?

Asbestos signs are a type of hazard sign and are used to highlight the risk of asbestos, which can harm the health of employees if disturbed and inhaled. While asbestos was banned before the turn of the century, many houses built before 2000 still include asbestos sheets, which are not harmful if untouched. However, if drilled into, dropped or disturbed, asbestos dust and fibres can be released into the air, which are harmful if inhaled.


Where should asbestos signs be located?

Wherever your employees may encounter asbestos, you should ensure an asbestos warning sign is installed. Furthermore, you should ensure any worker removing asbestos or working alongside asbestos is provided proper respiratory equipment to keep them safe. Our range of Respiratory Masks includes FFP3-graded face masks, which are suitable for this type of work. Please note that lower-graded face masks are not suitable for protecting against asbestos dust.


Are asbestos signs required by law?

Yes, asbestos signs are required by the Control of Asbestos regulations (2012) and the Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) regulations (1996). The former also includes invaluable information on the safe handling and disposing of asbestos, while the latter requires employers to provide adequate safety signage to highlight risks that cannot be removed. To learn more about the various risks you might face, discover our guide to the most common workplace hazards.