Traffic Signage

Roadworks require a lot of planning to ensure minimal disruption to motorists, workers and pedestrians. We offer a wide range of traffic signage to fit any project your business may be working on. For example, the Slow Temporary Traffic Sign is a great choice for warning motorists about a site entrance, while potential hazards can be highlighted with the Caution Site Entrance Sign and Heavy Plant Crossing Sign. These signs are lightweight but durable, and are perfect for situations where temporary traffic lights would be unsuitable. However, our traffic signage isn’t just for redirecting drivers. We also offer signs to help safely redirect pedestrians and foot traffic, including the Footpath Closed Aluminium Composite Cone Sign, which can be easily attached to a standard cone and used as a highly portable information sign for pedestrians. If your works include an alternate path for foot traffic, the Pedestrians Keep Left Temporary Traffic Sign should also be used. To learn more about what traffic signage your business might need, Read more....

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Why is traffic signage needed on a construction site?

Traffic signage is used on road works and construction projects that might impact pedestrians and motorists on the road. They are crucial to ensuring the safety of workers, pedestrians and motorists, as well as maintaining efficiency (as much as is reasonably possible) of the roads. There are three main types of traffic signage, which are:


Regulatory traffic signs

Regulatory traffic signs inform road users as to prohibited, restricted or mandatory actions. They utilise either a red circle (indicating prohibited and restricted actions) or a blue circle (indicating a mandatory action sign). For example, a temporary speed limit sign would be shown by a red sign as it instructs motorists not to exceed a certain speed, whereas a ‘keep this area clear’ sign would be blue as it includes a positive action to maintain safety.

Warning traffic signs

Warning traffic signs are used to alert pedestrians, workers and road users as to hazards on the road, particularly in the event of road works. These signs are usually portrayed by a red or yellow triangle. However, there are some exceptions, such as the highly common Footpath Closed sign, which uses a red rectangular shape. 


Guide traffic signs

Guide traffic signs are used to direct road users in a safe and appropriate direction. They are usually depicted by a blue circle or square shape. In road works, guide traffic signs can be extremely important for informing road users of obstructions, ensuring extra care and attention is taken in areas that require it.


Where should traffic signage be located?

The location of traffic signage will vary greatly depending on the types of signs required for your road works project. However, road works must always be bookmarked with Road Works signs in either direction to ensure road users are made aware as much as is reasonably possible. To discover the specific requirements of the vicarious types of traffic signage, you should refer to the Department of Transport’s Chapter 8 Regulations.


Is traffic signage required by law?

Yes, traffic signage is required by law and is included in several key pieces of legislation you should be aware of. These include the Safety At Street Works And Road Works (2013) codes of practice, which details the requirements of the Department of Transport’s Chapter 8 regulations and provides thorough information on road works signage. However, different road works projects will bring different hazards and require various traffic signage. As a result, according to the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1999), you should carry out a risk assessment before work can begin. This is a five-step process which helps ensure risks are identified, and every measure is taken to remove or minimise the impact and likelihood of said risks. To discover more about traffic signage and UK regulations, read our guide to construction traffic signage.